NEWS

凱拉瑞科技有限公司努力在國內外深耕科技行銷、國際貿易、人脈媒合,受各大媒體肯定

​受到國內外媒體報導內容整理

巴西 Brazil

​受巴西各大媒體青睞,受邀至專題報導

美國 America

團隊CTO受邀至拉斯維加斯進行虛擬實境應用演講。

台灣 Taiwan

與台灣企業共同開發醫療虛擬實境與銷售產品到南美洲

Immersive Design: Transforming Architecture with Virtual Reality

Virtual reality and other kinds of 3D visualization have been with us for decades. Building Information Modeling (BIM) has been with us for decades, too. And while architects and designers have been working to create immersive experiences from BIM models since at least the Autodesk Cyberspace project in 1988, recent advances in processors, display technology, and cloud connectivity are expanding the possibilities enabled by immersive technologies. Today, architects, engineers, and designers are using VR and other immersive experiences to convey design intent, streamline the design and construction process, and even optimize designs.

Seeing Is Believing

MRV, the leading residential construction company in Latin America, builds and sells more than 20,000 new apartments every year. They have historically marketed their apartments by building full-scale, fully decorated sample units that potential customers can walk around in. Igor Macedo, CTO of IM Designs, helped MRV make the transition to a virtual reality experience that has resulted in significant savings. He sat down for an interview about his work at AU Las Vegas 2019.

“The construction company has to build that sample,” Macedo says. “Each one costs between $60,000 and $500,000 depending on the apartment. By replacing that with a virtual reality one, you can reduce the waste of materials. It also helps with logistics, because you have to tear those sample units down. With VR, those costs are turned into relocating your digital experience.”

Igor Macedo explains how virtual reality can significantly reduce building costs, resulting in positive social impact.

For each sample apartment that is converted to a VR experience, the company can save between $50,000 and $100,000, Macedo says. “That’s raw savings. MRV has saved $20 million in two years just by converting physical apartments into virtual ones.” They can pass that savings on to customers, he explains, enabling them to make the units less expensive, thus putting them within closer reach for Brazil’s large middle and lower classes.

Check out the workflow Igor Macedo used to create the VR experience for MRV, featured in his AU 2019 class.

Building a Land Bridge to Better

The ability to convey design intent in an intuitive way, even to people with no background in design or construction, is an important benefit of design visualization and immersive technology. And that was the original goal when Ryan Noyes, a technology strategist with engineering and design firm VHB, turned to immersive tech to accelerate approval of a new land bridge project at James Madison University in Virginia. In the end, though, the VR experience delivered additional unexpected benefits.

The firm had already secured the contract to build a new residential structure on campus and construction was underway. When excavation for a parking structure left the university with 160,000 cubic yards of excess dirt and rock to dispose of, they asked VHB to help find a use for it. VHB’s solution was to propose a land bridge that would provide easy pedestrian access from the residential structure to the campus center, removing conflict with traffic on the street in between. “But we had to fast-track approval,” Noyes said when he spoke in the Theater at AU Las Vegas 2019. “We had to get the architectural review board to sign off quickly—with nontechnical staff.”

Insight for Better Buildings

Communicating design intent and improving collaboration is good. Actually improving design? That’s even better, and it’s what David Weir-McCall, a senior designer and digital design specialist for architectural firm CallisonRTKL, did with a recent research project that they called Insight.

“Historically, we as architects haven’t been great at getting feedback from users to inform design,” he said during his 2019 presentation in the AU Theater. “We looked for an agile development feedback loop where we we’re able to test out simulations, try new ideas, and measure successes and failures.”

“This is the way that technology and software companies develop product,” Weir-McCall points out. “We can take that into architecture and use VR to create this test-and-learn loop.” The process involved bringing BIM models into the Unreal engine, then tracking people as they went through the virtual space, measuring user position and sight data—what they actually looked at with the goggles on. “This helps us to identify where people are going and—just as important—where are they not going. What are they looking at? What’s their view angle? Why are we designing these incredible skylights and roofs if no one is looking at them?”

“What if architects could create design solutions before they even became a problem, and evolve spaces before they’re built?”

David Weir-McCall explores this and related questions in his AU Theater talk.

They used these data points to create what he calls “target meshes”—the objects on their sites that attracted the most attention. Based on their observations, they then iterated the designs. “If you take the positive elements and move them to an area where people aren’t walking or looking, does it retain the value?” Weir-McCall asks. “Does that space then get more value because of it? Is there something we can do to see if we can encourage people to go to those spaces?”

Ultimately, “we’re looking for ways to monitor spaces and use predictive analysis to anticipate design requirements,” he says. “What if architects could create design solutions before they even became a problem, and evolve spaces before they’re built?”

Get more tips and processes for creating effective VR experiences for architecture with David Weir-McCall's class and article.

The Experience of Design

BIM put data into our designs, but we haven’t always done much with that data. As immersive technologies have matured, they provide a powerful way to put that data to work. Whether it’s more aware stakeholders, more informed customers, more efficient workflows, or more ambitious designs, virtual reality and other 3D experiences give us new pathways to better understand the potentials of our built world and, ultimately, build better.

AUTODESK UNIVERSITY

2019年1月7日

【記者柯安聰台北報導】為強化亞果生醫(6748)於醫材行銷的競爭力與獨特性,該公司結合數位科技,把牙科手術拍攝成AR/VR虛擬實境影片,打造出一套醫材產品使用教學虛擬實境系統。

亞果生醫表示,未來將藉由這套系統開發,結合基礎到進階的術式,可快速讓臨床醫師知道材料使用方式,進而優化產品更新。隨著後疫情時代來臨,實體教學以及產品行銷推廣有其困難度,因此透過虛擬實境影片教育牙醫師如何正確使用該公司優質生醫材料,並且拓展至國內、東南亞及中國市場之各大牙醫教學醫院,對於亞果生醫產品國內、外推廣行銷將有重大助益。

亞果生醫謝達仁董事長表示,公司運用超臨界二氧化碳流體去細胞製程的新式牙科材料,結合Acalerate愛鑠邁斯虛擬實境(VR)系統,創造出一個牙科材料以及牙科術式結合的服務平台,從公司技術介紹以及產品特性介紹、基礎術式以及進階術式演示到實際進入手術模擬系統,醫師可以快速了解產品特性如何使用,並參加各種新式術式的前導教學,加強後續意見領袖醫師KOLs課程的吸引力以及熟悉度。廠商亦可從服務平台的後台分析,了解現階段醫師們對於什麼產品以及術式的配合興趣最高,以及了解何種組合順手度最高,可以進一步的優化產品製程以及行銷方向,以期強化公司未來營運動能。

2021年12月7日